Best seller

Red pill

Red Pill: The Truth About Leadership by Paul Ballman

Book review by Sarah Stocks – Red Pill: The Truth About Leadership by Paul Ballman

On reading the jacket I expected more answers, however, what I did get was a real challenge to how I am always looking for the secret formula for success. 

As a trainer, I am always asked for the most up to date thinking, when actually some of the old ways still have traction and many of the 'new' ways are just the old wrapped up in a shiny new bow!

The real examples of successful companies and CEOs who suddenly fall from grace really adds impact to what is being said. In taking the red pill and facing reality, this book does not give you the magic formula but challenges the assumptions that you need to spend huge amounts of money on 'solutions' when you may already have the answer - in fact if you as a leader are ready to embrace the sometimes painful truth of reality, then read the red pill.

3 stars: Good, worth reading by a manager or leader


There are very few key statistics; however, the message is based on experiences, stories, reflections and the educational ladder.  It is highly philosophical and inspirational.  

I had not considered politics in the way Bonnie highlighted it.  I am led to agree with some of her arguments although they relate at an executive boardroom level within an American office setting and culture. I am now aware that politics do exist in the workplace.   I enjoyed reading the tips of the trade and how to be successful.  This can be applied through coaching or mentoring a colleague who may be faced with political dilemmas.



The realities of the author’s life matched with a determination to succeed make this book appealing and I would recommend it to ambitious employees who have the drive and want to climb the corporate ladder.
There are very few key statistics; however, the message is based on experiences, stories, reflections and the educational ladder.  It is highly philosophical and inspirational.  

I had not considered politics in the way Bonnie highlighted it.  I am led to agree with some of her arguments although they relate at an executive boardroom level within an American office setting and culture. I am now aware that politics do exist in the workplace.   I enjoyed reading the tips of the trade and how to be successful.  This can be applied through coaching or mentoring a colleague who may be faced with political dilemmas.



The realities of the author’s life matched with a determination to succeed make this book appealing and I would recommend it to ambitious employees who have the drive and want to climb the corporate ladder.