Pay gap between male and female managers narrowing, study shows

The financial divide between men and women has narrowed, although men tend to be more confident when it comes to career development, according to the latest findings unveiled by Halifax.

Research showed that women's earnings have risen faster than men's with female employees working full-time seeing pay increases of 37 per cent, compared with a 30 per cent rise for men.

However, their figures also showed that men are more likely to be in employment than women, with 54 per cent of women in jobs compared to 64 per cent of men.

Anthony Warrington, director for Halifax, said: "In 2013 the financial divide between men and women remains pronounced, however in some areas the gap continues to close.

"It is positive that the pay gap between the sexes continues to reduce and that men and women are equally likely to save into a corporate pension scheme."

Recently, a study by Prudential  revealed that the pension gender gap is 13 per cent wider than it was the year before, with men retiring on £6,500 more than women.

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Comments

The problem here is with averaging, not gender discrimination. Many starting female physicians earn as much or more than the “average male.” The “mystery” could be solved by doing a study which compared the billable charges the employer can make by physician employee. Of course, many factors such as specialty, hours worked, location, call schedule applications and other things impact that metric. Nevertheless, this website can always assist in financial difficulties.